Exercises of Endurance, Resistance, and Flexibility Combat Affects of Aging Body

Image via Houston Chronicle

This week’s trivia question asked what types of exercises help compensate for age-related changes of the body and mind. Do endurance exercises, such as walking and swimming help? Does resistance training, such as through weights or even body weight exercise help? Does stretching, such as through yoga, help? The answer is yes Each of these exercise approaches contribute to slowing the progression of age-related changes in the body and mind.

The American College of Sports Medicine and American Heart Association recommend endurance, resistance, and flexibility exercises to address age-related changes (Chodzko-Zajko, et al., 2009). Doing each of these at least two times per week with moderate intensity strengthens muscles the cardiovascular system. Muscles lose mass as we age and contributes to falls risks as well as reduces the ability to protect bone and joint changes in an aging body. The aging cardiovascular system can develop plaque within arteries increasing the risk for heart-attacks and strokes. Flexible muscles can strengthen and help with managing balance more easily.

While these three exercise approaches do help slow age-related changes to the body and mind, so too does choosing healthier food options and no longer smoking. Resisting a sedentary lifestyle is key. You can start slow. Just go for a 20-30 minute walk each day and increase as you are ready, as you feel stronger. Being intentional about improving your fitness gives you the right mindset. So, get up and get going! And check our social media again on Monday of each week to see that week’s trivia question. Then, after your workout, come back to our website on Friday to see the trivia answer. Thank you to everyone who participated this week!

Reference:

Chodzko-Zajko, W.J., Proctor, D.N., Fiatarone Singh, M.A., Minson, C.T., Nigg, C.R., Salem, G.J. et al. (2009). American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Exercise and physical acivity for older adults. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 41, 1510-1530

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